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The library’s Hoopla service has put together this special collection of audiobooks for kids in celebration of Black History Month. Download one and listen now—they’re only a click away with your library card!


He's Got The Whole World In His Hands

He's Got The Whole World In His Hands

By Kadir Nelson

Through sublime landscapes and warm images of a boy and his family, this adaptation of the beloved folk song creates a dazzling, intimate interpretation that rejoices in the connectedness of people and nature.


Barack Obama

Barack Obama

By Nikki Grimes

Ever since Barack Obama was young, Hope has lived inside him. From the beaches of Hawaii to the streets of Chicago, from the jungles of Indonesia to the plains of Kenya, he has held on to Hope. Even as a boy, Barack knew he wasn’t quite like anybody else, but through his journeys he found the ability to listen to Hope and become what he was meant to be: a bridge to bring people together.


I, Too, Sing America

I, Too, Sing America

By Catherine Clinton

Starting with Lucy Terry of the early eighteenth century and finishing with poet laureate Rita Dove, this inspiring anthology edited by Catherine Clinton captures the enormous talent and passion of black poets. Powerful and diverse, I, Too, Sing America is a forum for voices baring their souls, speaking their minds, tracing their roots and proclaiming their dreams.


A Nation's Hope

A Nation's Hope

By Matt de la Peña

On the eve of World War II, African-American boxer Joe Louis fought German Max Schmeling in a bout that had more at stake than just the world heavyweight title; for much of America, their fight came to represent America’s war with Germany. This elegant and powerful biography centers around the historic fight in which black and white America were able to put aside prejudice and come together to celebrate our nation’s ideals.


A Spy Called James

A Spy Called James

By Anne Rockwell

This is the true story of James Lafayette, a slave who spied for George Washington’s army during the American Revolution. But while America celebrated its newfound freedom, James returned to slavery. His service hadn’t qualified him for the release he’d been hoping for. For James, the fight wasn’t over; he’d already helped his country gain its freedom, now it was time to win his own.


Because They Marched

Because They Marched

By Russell Freedman

In the early 1960s, tired of reprisals for attempting to register to vote, Selma’s black community began to protest. The struggle received nationwide attention when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led a voting rights march in January, 1965, and was attacked by a segregationist. In February, the shooting of an unarmed demonstrator by an Alabama state trooper inspired a march from Selma to the state capital of Montgomery.


Benny Goodman And Teddy Wilson

Benny Goodman And Teddy Wilson

By Lesa Cline-Ransome

Brought together by the love of playing jazz music, Teddy Wilson and Benny Goodman broke the color barrier in entertainment when they formed the Benny Goodman Trio with Gene Krupa. This lush and lyrical picture book tells the story of how two musical prodigies from very different backgrounds—one a young black boy growing up in Tuskegee, Alabama, the other the son of struggling Russian-Jewish immigrants from the West Side of Chicago—were brought together by their love of music, and helped create the jazz style known as swing.


King For Kids

King For Kids

By Clayborne Carson

For the first time, an edition of Martin Luther King’s most important speeches and selected sermons are assembled specifically for school-age-children and families to listen to together. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is known for being one of the greatest orators of the 20th Century, and perhaps in all of American history. In the 1950s and 1960s, his words led the Civil Rights movement and helped change society.


March On!

March On!

By Christine King Farris

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s sister presents a personal, stirring account of the remarkable day Dr. King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech and of the man who went on to inspire nation.


Mumbet's Declaration Of Independence

Mumbet's Declaration Of Independence

By Gretchen Woelfle

Everybody knows about the Founding Fathers and the Declaration of Independence in 1776. But the founders weren’t the only ones who believed that everyone had a right to freedom. Mumbet, a Massachusetts slave, believed it too. She longed to be free, but how? Would anyone help her in her fight for freedom? Could she win against her owner, the richest man in town? Mumbet was determined to try.


Separate Is Never Equal

Separate Is Never Equal

By Duncan Tonatiuh

Almost ten years before Brown vs. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California. An American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage who spoke and wrote perfect English, Mendez was denied enrollment to a whites-only school. Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California.


Voice Of Freedom

Voice Of Freedom

By Carole Boston Weatherford

Despite fierce prejudice and abuse, even being beaten to within an inch of her life, Fannie Lou Hamer was a champion of civil rights from the 1950s until her death in 1977. Integral to the Freedom Summer of 1964, Ms. Hamer gave a speech at the Democratic National Convention that, despite President Johnson’s interference, aired on national TV news and spurred the nation to support the Freedom Democrats. Voice of Freedom celebrates Fannie Lou Hamer’s life and legacy with a message of hope, determination, and strength.



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